The Grey Chronicles

2009.November.26

The Travian Romans Are Attacking! Part XII


Roman LegionnaireI have started this series of posts weeks ago, and I really like the lessons I learned along the way. Although my posts have been delayed lately because of the intermittent Internet connection, some readers viewed the previous post and kept coming back for more. I never intended to generate a lot of conversation regarding this post, unlike my previous posts on Filipinos and about business management, yet I also received personal emails or In-Game Message [IGM] from various Travian players in different Servers about my experience and one particular writer asked whether my self-imposed strategy of not upgrading resource fields prior to gaining a level 10 Cranny is reaping its perceived benefit. I replied that I have yet to see that because for days my Village had not been the recipient of an attack or raid. But as a teaser, I wrote that the supposed farmers after my beginner’s protection wore off stopped when I created a (Hero) plus the fact that I was invited by an Alliance surging to the top!

COM10 Attack Logs: 20 - 30 November 2009

The figure shows the graphical Attack Logs of my Village from 20 to 30 November. The panel above shows the relationship of Loot Efficiency versus the number of Attacking Troops from my Village and those defending the attacked Village. The panel below shows the stack of loot per resource type taken from the Defenders’s Village.

The day began with a raid on a Roman Village, a neighbor with an unusual name. Several of my Alliance comrades already attacked this one with less than five troops and gained no loot. I tried with ten Legionnaires with the same result.

I raided another Roman Village, a probable farm with a population more than my Village. I already raided this Village yesterday but gained nothing, and I was surprised that this second time, with three [3] Legionnaires left to fend off raids on my own Village, I looted 50 Wood (wood), 50 Clay (clay), 61 Iron (iron) but still NO Crop (crop), the resource my Village was needing the most!

Next was a raid on another Roman Village, but resulted to nothing looted. This one is a tough customer. For the whole week, I have raided this Village three times and I have not gained anything. Maybe, what I was doing all along, this Village was doing the same thing. Aha . . . I will just wait when he makes a mistake!

Before I turned in for bed, I raided a Teuton Village in the outskirts of my 7×7. I had been eying on this one for sometime now, but with the Village population more than my Village, I assumed that he had troops more than what I got. I found out later in the Attack Logs that the latter is really true: 26 Clubswingers versus my 13 Legionnares plus a Hero. Both of our troops incurred casualties: 13 Clubswingers dead and six of my Legionnaires. The good thing was that my Legionnaire-turned-Hero Hero gained 13 kills. If I raided this Village without a Hero (Hero), most of my raiding Legionnaires would have been deciminated.

Tossing in my sleep, I resolved not to attack the next day. I should be upgrading the crop fields if I were to continue building military installations. With my dimished number of troops after a devastating raid on the abovementioned Teutonic Village, maybe dividing them into raiding party and defense party would have been much better.


Notes:

All resource icons taken from Travian help files.

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 LicenseDisclaimer: The posts herein do not necessarily represent any organization’s positions, strategies or opinions. Read the full version of self-imposed rules for this blog: A New Year; New Rules. Unless otherwise expressly stated, the posts are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
Comments are moderated to keep the discussion relevant and civil. Readers are responsible for their own statements.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: