The Grey Chronicles

2008.November.16

ID ten T Syndrome


For the past four years, I’ve encountered this computer syndrome called: ID ten T. Here are some examples:


Here’s one from a System Administrator:

Per computer at least one or two virus scanners are allowed and should complement each other to work properly. To ensure that no two virus scanners scan at the same time and your computer won’t crawl you should try changing the schedule for the scanning.

Annotations: In Microsoft’s Antivirus Defense in Depth whitepaper, it cited four problems caused by interoperability issues of running anti-virus applications from a number of different application vendors on the same machine, i.e., memory overhead, system crashes or stop errors, performance loss and loss of system access.

In layman’s terms, the whitepaper can be summarized as: most of these virus scanners are installed with default settings, which unfortunately includes that their respective active protection or real-time scanning is enabled after installation. Unless, of course, the user tweaks the configuration of these scanners to disable one active protection, there is no guarantee that a PC is running only one scanner actively, in real-time, but rather they run along side each other once the PC is ON. Thus, “Changing the schedule for the scanning,” as claimed doesn’t change the fact that the Active Protection or real-time scan of a virus scanner is also changed.


Here’s another:

Yes, I am the Administrator because I am the owner of this Windows XP laptop computer.

Annotations: Being the owner of a laptop computer, does not necessarily mean that one is the Administrator. A computer administrator can be designated by a System Administrator or the shop where the laptop had been purchased could have installed the operating system, thus there could already be a designated Administrator other than the owner.
An Administrator is the one who installed the Operating System, or a user granted with administrative privileges. Computer-illiterate users are, most often than not, given only Limited privileges so as not to create havoc on the operating system, especially Windows XP.


Here’s one from a self-proclaimed Super User:

I installed Deep Freeze to save the system from being infected further with malwares!

Annotations: Deep Freeze, similar to Windows Steady State, help protect the computer from inappropriate Web content, or save computer settings from unwelcome changes. But not if the computer have ALREADY been attacked by malware, and these malwares had not been effectively cleaned from the system.
If the latter is the case, one is also "deep-freezing" the malware, which is reactivated whenever a user turns the computer back ON. Install Deep Freeze only after a fresh install of a Windows Operating System.


Here’s from an email received from a Yahoo!Answers’s member:

I pressed E, N, T, E, and R keys but it does not do anything!

The ENTER key is also the Return key. Some keyboards only show a enter. In a standard 101-keyboard, this is usually located to the right of the " key. The command ENTER is not pressed separately by each letter, but rather a user has to press the Return Key.


For all these instances, these users are definitely afflicted with the ID ten T syndrome, prevalent on computer-illiterate users.


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2 Comments »

  1. nice info, thanks for sharing.

    visit : http://filesearch.web.id/Yahoo_Answers to find all yahoo question and answer easily.

    Comment by filesearch.web.id — 2010.March.10 @ 11:47 | Reply

    • I am also a member of Yahoo!Answers, using my real name there. Rey Adel is my pseudonym. During the past months, however, I have barely visited the site because some users or “askers” keep on repeating the same questions asked a thousand times. Probably some of these “askers” do not have the time or the presence of mind to search Yahoo!Answers first before asking the same questions.

      Comment by reyadel — 2010.March.13 @ 18:36 | Reply


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