The Grey Chronicles

2008.November.7

How to Write a Master’s Thesis, Epilogue


Continued from 28 October: Part 7

Yesterday, 06 November, I finally submitted ten (10) bookbound copies of my thesis to the university’s School of Graduate Studies. Thus, this would be the last part of this topic.

There was some sort of a feeling of relief, accomplishment and finality.

For two years, I have researched, wrote, re-wrote, edited, and proof-read several pages of my thesis. I argued with my adviser, almost became crazy due to her antics, forgetfulness, and mood swings. Yet, I became older and wiser, to say the least.

A week before I submitted the bound copies, the MBM Coordinator urged me to join a Best Research Competition slated on 07 February 2009. I was shocked because previously my thesis received so many comments to the contrary, such as:

My adviser said, "Your thesis is no longer significant!"

A reader said, "Your thesis is too emotional!"

A reviewer suggested, "Maybe you could use local steel company instead of National Steel Corporation."

Another reader said, "Your thesis is too long!"

Two weeks before that, I had to shorten a 278-page thesis into a 15-page summary. For the Best Thesis Competition, moreover, I have yet to decrease it to ten-page summary. This summary is now percolating in my mind, editing out some non-essential paragraphs here and there, and deletion of some references in the bibliography.

The abstract alone, formerly in the bound version, a two-page double-spaced article, became a one page 14-point Times New Roman in the 15-page summary, to quote:

Flat carbon steel production in the privatized National Steel Corporation (NSC) during the Wing Tiek-Hottick era succumbed to external forces, such as the onslaught of cheap steel imports and the cyclical movement of global steel prices, vis-à-vis fortuitous events in the 1990s. Three prominent events were considered: the Philippine trade liberalization, the Asian Financial Crises in 1997-1998 and the global slowdown of steel demand. Albeit a succession of promising internal factors: high mill-utilization and production rates, soaring material and prime yields, plus diminutive customer complaints for its finished products, NSC was threatened with liquidation in 1999, then officially closed on 07 May 2000.

The study attempted to merge quantitative data with qualitative facts through time-line series graphs, an investigative reconstruction of the past, and the before-and-after effects of the three events to NSC flat steel production. NSC flat carbon steel production is significantly correlated to ASEAN steel demand, and highly, significantly correlated to Global Steel, Flat Steel and Asian steel price indices. Furthermore, NSC’s flat production is significantly correlated to the following NSC’s internal factors: production rate, material yield, and quality, in terms of customer acceptance rate.

NSC facilities was revived in 2004 by Global Steel Holdings, Ltd. (GSHL) as Global Steelworks Infrastructures, Inc. (GSII) then later renamed as Global Steel Philippines (SPV-AMC), Inc (GSPI) in 2005. GSPI promised to inject fresh capital and bring back former NSC’s dominance in the Philippine steel market, and aggressively venture partnerships in China, ASEAN, and the world.

A SWOT matrix draws attention to the following STEP recommendations for GSPI: the benchmarking of the organization (structure); the maximization of base capacity production through efficient use of resources through ISO 9001:2000 (tasks); the strengthening of GSPI’s domestic market penetration (environment); the upgrade of GSPI employees’ compensation package (people); and eventually, the revival of the ISM project, among others.


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1 Comment »

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